A Meta-Analytic Review of the Relations Between Motivation and Reading Achievement for K–12 Students

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Debbie_Hepplewhite
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A Meta-Analytic Review of the Relations Between Motivation and Reading Achievement for K–12 Students

Postby Debbie_Hepplewhite » Tue Jun 23, 2020 11:00 pm

Thank you to teacher-blogger, Greg Ashman, for flagging up this paper:

A Meta-Analytic Review of the Relations Between Motivation and Reading Achievement for K–12 Students

Jessica R. Toste, Lisa Didion, Peng Peng, Marissa J. Filderman, Amanda M. McClelland


A new meta-analysis is up that looks at various aspects of reading and their association with motivation.

https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10 ... 4320919352

What I found particularly striking is that longitudinal analysis finds a bidirectional relationship between reading performance and motivation but the relationship between early reading performance and later motivation is the stronger of the two.

By all means, get children excited about books and reading, but it is even more important to give them early reading success.

Regards

Greg


Abstract

The purpose of this meta-analytic review was to investigate the relation between motivation and reading achievement among students in kindergarten through 12th grade. A comprehensive search of peer-reviewed published research resulted in 132 articles with 185 independent samples and 1,154 reported effect sizes (Pearson’s r). Results of our random-effects metaregression model indicate a significant, moderate relation between motivation and reading, r = .22, p < .001. Moderation analyses revealed that the motivation construct being measured influenced the relation between motivation and reading. There were no other significant moderating or interaction effects related to reading domain, sample type, or grade level. Evidence to support the bidirectional nature of the relation between motivation and reading was provided through longitudinal analyses, with findings suggesting that earlier reading is a stronger predictor of later motivation than motivation is of reading. Taken together, the findings from this meta-analysis provide a better understanding of how motivational processes relate to reading performance, which has important implications for developing effective instructional practices and fostering students’ active engagement in reading. Theoretical and practical implications of these findings for reading development are discussed.

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